Design Iterations – Category Directory

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Design Iterations – Category Directory

Iteration 5 – Results of testing the installation

After testing some problems arose which were quite easily solved. One problem being that the outline was not very visible around people because they were far away from the camera. By simply increasing the stoke their outlines were more visible and actually made a better outcome than I expected. When I was testing the installation on my own at home it looked good but in a large area it work really well. I was asked about it by a person stood close and I explained to him what it was and what I wanted to achieve, he said it was “really cool and intriguing”.

Iteration 5 – Results of testing the installation

People in the space

There were many people walking through the space we tested in. Some people walked passed with noticing what was going on and what we were doing, obviously too busy performing to impress their friends. There were a minority that stood by the door and waiting as if we were taking photos and they did not want to get in the way, which was quite funny to see. There were others who were intrigued by what we were doing and actually interacted with the installations. I overheard one person in a group asking “shall we go over and see what it is?” but the rest of the group held back and did not want to draw attention to themselves. I a sense this also reflects on performance as that group wishes to remain in their private sector rather than publicly performing to the camera to see what it’s all about.

IMG_0355

People in the space

Face Tracking – Open CV

Before starting my installation I realised that it would be very difficult to animate over people who are moving on the screen. Creating whole body blurring or pixelation on movement would be challenging as a new user of processing. I began finding other methods interaction, Face Tracking in Open CV is a great start. In order for my installation to work I need to understand and use face-tracking to pixelate people who look at the screen and those who don’t look at the screen. As you can see in the screen shot below I have a white rectangle in front of my face. This has been made by simply adding a fill to the pre-made rectangle and changing the colours to black and white. I think that it is a good idea to test how this particular processing face tracking works. Covering up a facial features removes the rectangle as it can no longer recognise my face. When this is placed in a public space problems may occur. One problem being that if people in the space are not looking at the camera or they are covering their face, they will not be pixelated.

Screen Shot 2014-12-12 at 15.50.35

 

Face Tracking – Open CV

The Space – Ground floor of Weymouth House

The photos below show the ground floor of Weymouth house where my installation will be tested and hopefully put up in. It’s quite an open space with varying amounts of people walking through. After visiting Weymouth house at different times it is easy to say that lunch time is where it is most busy. People walking through, queuing for coffee and sitting in seating areas. I would argue that this is a very useful place to have my installation as I will be able to see how people react in large groups and in small groups. I will be able to see how the installation works with a small amount of people and a large amount of people.

IMG_0207  IMG_0205

 

The Space – Ground floor of Weymouth House

First Ideas – CCTV style

One way I could make the installation contextualise performance both public and private is by making it represent publicity. I can do this by making the recording made by the camera look like CCTV style footage through the use of the date and time at the bottom. This combined with my pixelation idea, something which is also very common in CCTV footage will embody the idea of public surveillance and the way people act in a public space. This has given me quite an easy first step in creating my installation. To complete this I will need to research into how to create a real time clock that will sit in front of a video. As seen in the image below the date and time are at the bottom. I aim to replicate something like this in my work to achieve what I said perviously in this post. 

Diana inquest

First Ideas – CCTV style

Access – an interactive art installation by Marie Sester

I have started searching for existing installations that conceptualise and represent similar ideas to mine. Through this I can find more inspiration which will assist me in creating my own installation. I also find that analysing other designer’s work helps me both create and analyse my own work.

This installation follows and uses similar ideas to what my installation is going to express. As seen in the video, the installation registers the movement of an individual in a confined public space and highlights them with a spotlight. This spotlight is somewhat similar to prison escape comedy sketches, these sketches could be argued to be widely recognised and understood. Arguably, people would interact with installation in a similar way to those comedy sketches. Here we can begin to see how the installation initiates performance, by singling out an individual they are encouraged to act differently as their identity has become public. As seen in the video demonstration, the individual goes from walking casually in a predictable manner in their own private space to running around or walking in an unpredictable manner, maybe in order to escape the spotlight or the public’s eye.

This installation contextualises a similar idea to mine. However instead of using the installation to interact with an individual to single them out in a public space, my installation interacts with all of the people moving in the space by blurring them and people standing still are untouched by the installation. In this way my installation is similar due to the fact that individuals are singled out to encourage performance but the way in which people are singled out is almost the opposite.

Access – an interactive art installation by Marie Sester